Démystifions le pissenlit

Dandelion is a plant native to Europe that can also be found in North America. In Canada, dandelions grow in the wild, but it is also cultivated commercially. It is sometimes used as a diuretic (SeeGamma Force Dandelion Extract) and for various conditions, such as gastrointestinal symptoms and infections. However, research into the health effects of dandelion is limited and there is no evidence to support the use of dandelion for any health problem. Despite this, dandelion remains an interesting food to include in your menu.

Prebiotics

Dandelion contains prebiotics. Prebiotics are carbohydrates that the body cannot digest and that feed the probiotics, the good bacteria found in the gut. Consuming prebiotics helps multiply and maintain probiotics in the gut. There are different types of prebiotics, including fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and galactooligosaccharides (GOS). Prebiotics are found naturally in many foods, including dandelion roots which contain inulin, a type of FOS.

Vitamin E

Dandelion also contains vitamin E. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that can help keep the immune system healthy and help protect against chronic diseases (eg cardiovascular disease and cancer). The main sources of vitamin E are fatty foods like seeds, nuts and vegetable oils. However, it is also found in some dark leafy green vegetables, such as dandelion. In fact, one cup (250 mL) of chopped raw dandelion leaves provides 2 mg of vitamin E, or about 13% of an adult's daily requirement.

Dandelion in the kitchen

Dandelion is a dark leafy green vegetable, like spinach and Swiss chard. Its slightly bitter-tasting green leaves can be eaten raw or cooked when young. On the other hand, it is better to cook the older leaves. Let's see how to use dandelion in cooking.

  1. In salads, soups, pasta or eggs
  2. As a substitute for other dark leafy green vegetables, such as kale, swiss chard and spinach
  3. In herbal teas
  4. Finally, roasted dandelion roots are sometimes used as a coffee substitute, as are chicory roots.

References

  1. https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/dandelion
  2. https://www.unlockfood.ca/fr/Articles/Cuisine/preparation-des-aliments/Tout-a-propos-de-legumes-verts-a-feuilles-sombres.aspx
  3. https://www.unlockfood.ca/fr/Articles/Elements-nutritifs-(vitamines-et-mineraux)/Ce-que-vous-devez-savoir-au-sujet-de-la-vitamine-E.aspx
  4. https://www.unlockfood.ca/fr/Articles/Aliments-probiotiques/prebiotiques/Les-prebiotiques.aspx
  5. Canadian Nutrient File
AlimentationSanté

Leave a comment

All comments are moderated before posting